99 out of 10GreatSchools

Haworth Elementary School

Haworth, NJ
  • Public
  • |
  • Grades K-8
  • |
  • Enrollment: 419

Overview

Haworth Elementary School
205 Valley Road
Haworth, NJ 07641
(201) 384-5526
Haworth Elementary School is located in Haworth, NJ and serves grades K-8.It received a GreatSchool rating of 9 out of 10
This information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed.

Student Diversity

Race

Percentage

Black
1%
Hispanic
5%
Two or more races
8%
Asian
12%
White
73%
Other
1%

Reviews3 Reviews

1.5
student
I am still a student at the school, and while the new administration is wildly effective with the elementary schoolers, the middle schoolers are left ignored and neglected. The school deals with real world issues in all the wrong ways, and while they may help kids build their character, they struggle to help those who have already developed. Additionally, their learning strategies are less than adequate and they don't really know what they are doing. The teachers are amazing, but the common core curriculum and the way that the teachers are told to teach aren't great.
student
I left HPS this year, after attending it from Kindergarten until the end of eighth grade. All I can say is that from the time I was young until now the school has slowly become a worse and worse place. In 2016 they lost most of their good teachers, (most facts that were undisclosed to students, but we figured it out quite fast. This town likes to gossip...) and ever since then most of the replacements haven't taught us anything we need to know for High School. For example, we use to have tough teachers that gave us a good amount of homework and taught us concepts that could be applicable in subjects such as writing, math, science, etc. Now, we barely go home with reading to do, and have learned nothing useful since before the dozens of teachers got fired, and new (inexperienced ones) were teaching us instead. In addition to the teachers becoming worse, the school board has shown (countless amounts of times) that they don't care about their students. They care about their "image" and upholding it. Here's one example. Years ago, classes were split up by level (kind of like honors). All of the Gifted and Talented (a program for a select group of kids in every grade) including myself, all the execrated math kids (kids who were doing math a year above our level), and people with particularly good grades were grouped together in one class (although I'm betting to admit the school wouldn't admit to this now, as no teachers ever admitted to it when we figured it out and asked them about it). Most people in the classes (and their parents) were happy with the arrangement, as the kids who learned at a slower pace could get the help they needed, and the kids who learned quicker could digest as much information as they could. That was, until a few parents complained that their (not quite smart) kids were put into the "dumb" class, and not the "smart" one. The next school year, I walked into a class full of kids who learned much slower than I did, and I don't think I had the slightest bit of homework pretty much that entire year. Also, I'd finish work so quickly before most of my peers I'd have time to lie down and take a nap before the next period (trust me, this happened at least once a week). I can confidently say that Haworth Public School did not prepare me for High School as well as surrounding schools, such as Demarest and Closter, prepared their students.
parent
Now that the semi-retired superintendent's tenure is coming to an end, there may be hope that the focus of the school will slowly come back to what a school's goals should be: to educate the children as opposed to "District leaders want students to increase their language arts test scores by 5 percent." Otherwise, there will be more parents taking their children into a private school.